Keys to a Good Mobile Store #Infographic

Everyone values their time, and you should value that of your customers. It has been shown that 18% of users will abandon a purchase if it takes longer than five seconds to load. That is like having a 20% tax just for not investing the money in a good web server and developer. The rule is always to have the simple stuff down before you move on to more complex pursuits. There should be no mention of advanced graphics, animations, and analytics until your website is streamlined enough to load in a tolerable amount of time.makes great websites that don’t have any of these problems, and they are very trustworthy. 

Additional to this is how you structure your mobile store versus your desktop store. As you are working with different sized screens, these stores should be different. Customers don’t want to feel like the information is being presented in such a way that is deceptive or leads something out, and that’s exactly what could happen if you don’t think about how to structure your page in an intelligent way. You see this all the time with hidden taxes and strange page formats, and it is not the way to win over customers. 

It is estimated that 30% of consumers who have a bad mobile purchasing experience will never return to that site again, and it makes sense. If you struggled to find the “Add to Cart” button or found the way shipping options read to be confusing, why would you return? There are too many options out there to waste your time on a poor website. This is why every company should make it an extreme priority to have a great mobile user experience. The returns you get on this are far higher than you will find in most other activities. 

 

Mobile
Courtesy of: Website Builder.org

 

One comment on “Keys to a Good Mobile Store #Infographic”

  1. Ricardo Ramos

    Users and companies have been changing their behavior/strategies towards mobile apps and social media, in prejudice of websites.

    Social media is becoming increasingly important (some companies are not even bothering to build a website). Today, nearly 80% of business have a dedicated team, social media is now a standard operating procedure.

    Sports stars, like Lionel Messi, Kobe Bryant and Cristiano Ronaldo, have left websites almost completely and are engaging with their fans via Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. The website they own is not devoted to the player itself or to sell products, but as a place to promote their social media profiles.

    Another example is obsessee.com. obsessee.com has as its only function to connect to their various social media profiles. And there are other examples of brands that only exist solely on social media.
    There are more than one million apps in major app stores, something like an app for any circumstance in our life. In the scientific literature, there are evidences that users prefer to use Mobile Applications instead of web browsing, and stores which have an app have more chances of selling their products than those who do not (Kang, Mun, & Johnson, 2015).

    This evidence suggests a change in users’ behavior and companies’ strategy towards Websites, influenced by the increasing use of Social Media and Mobile Apps.

    As an expert, what do you think about this?
    Why do you think users are changing their behavior?
    Can you imagine this a problem to the future of websites due to its (probable) decreasing use?

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Andre Bourque (SocialMarketingFella) is Editor Emeritus of Technorati.

He covers emerging trends and news in social, mobile, cloud, and related technologies.

Based in San Francisco, he can be contacted via his social channels and at: andrefbourque@gmail.com

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